Cornish Lithium Ltd | News & Media
Keep up to date on Cornish Lithium with our News and Media section, including company announcements, press releases and industry news.
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  • Cornish Lithium's Jeremy Wrathall tells Proactive says Cornwall has a high presence of Lithium brines across the region from information that stretches back decades. Wrathall says the company has a special agreement with Lord Falmouth, Cornwall's biggest landowner, to digitise his collection of mining maps to further expand knowledge of the area. He adds that the company has "stepped on the accelerator" by hiring more staff and is currently looking into where exactly drill targets should be located.

  • We are pleased to report that our exploration programme is progressing well, and the technical team has now grown to 7 geologists and a digital archivist, all based at our offices in Cornwall. Our focus remains firmly on the excellent potential for extracting lithium from geothermal brines over a large area in Cornwall. The imminent restart of exploration for geothermal power in Cornwall is expected to boost understanding of the subsurface geology and the flow of lithium bearing fluids.

  • Cornish Lithium is delighted to be working closely with team of data scientists at the Satellite Applications Catapult (“Catapult”) in leading a new study, funded by Innovate UK, to see if it is possible to detect a lithium ‘fingerprint’ from space by imaging vegetation and minerals on the ground using satellite technology.

  • Cornish Lithium and Tregothnan Estates are pleased to announce that they have signed a Binding Agreement. The agreement allows Cornish Lithium to explore for, and to commercially develop lithium contained in hot spring brines on the land and mineral rights owned by Tregothnan Estates.

  • In 2016, Cornish Lithium was set up to take advantage of Cornwall’s historic reserves of lithium and the increasingly bullish market for the previously unremarkable mineral. Then in August this year, the company managed to secure the necessary investment to begin exploration works.

  • Cornwall was once a hive of mining in the UK history and now it has come to the fore again. The mining and extraction of Lithium in Cornwall is becoming bigger and bigger business. We speak with Jeremy Wrathall, CEO of Cornish Lithium, who talks to us about their project in Cornwall and how the increased interest from the Government in renewable energies, Tesla's new factory in Germany and the sheer size of the deposits make the project an increasingly fascinating one.

  • Cornish Lithium today announces that it has secured a £1 million investment from a group of highly experienced mining and natural resources investors. The funds raised will enable the Company to commence exploration activities on the ground in Cornwall. The initial focus will be to collate all relevant data on lithium occurrences in Cornwall and to assemble this in digital format.

  • It has all the elements of the best mystery stories: old documents hidden away in obscure corners of offices, ancient books on dusty library shelves containing long-forgotten but vital information, clues scattered here and there in passing references to other things, shadowy figures protecting long-standing rights held for generations and at the end of it all the possibility of a discovering a new and very rich treasure in the long-abandoned underground mines of Cornwall.

  • Jeremy Wrathall, Chief Executive of Cornish Lithium and a mining analyst at Investec, updates viewers about ‘the Cornish operation’ and the company’s fund raising exercise.

  • Cornish Lithium, today announces that it plans to explore for, and to potentially develop, lithium contained in underground hot spring brines in Cornwall. The presence of lithium in hot spring brines in Cornwall has been known since the mid-1800s but this was regarded as a curiosity, given there was no developed market for the metal at that time. New technology now offers the potential to extract lithium from these hot spring brines and to supply product to the rapidly growing battery market for electric cars and for power storage.